Announcing our kid-safe alternative to YouTube’s video player for kids and family publishers

Social plugins are one of the biggest unintentional harvesters of children’s personal data. Every time a child loads a web page or app which has a social widget, it’s gathering vast amounts of personal information about their activity. YouTube’s video player is one of the biggest examples of this.

Lacking any real kidtech alternative, YouTube is the default embedded video player used by family and kids publishers and brands – but the data it collects on its under-13 users is now being viewed as a violation of COPPA. A coalition of over 20 child advocacy, consumer and privacy groups recently filed a complaint with the FTC accusing YouTube of enabling the collection of personal data on millions of children across the US.

Today we’ve announced a solution to this problem: a fully kid-safe (COPPA and GDPR-K compliant) embeddable social video player.

Already delivering millions of video views, our embeddable video player is part of the PopJam Connect platform, which also provides tools for kid-safe social engagement for content owners and brands.

The player integrates PopJam’s award-winning kid-safe social features, enabling children to safely engage with content. It can be customised by the publisher, with a self-serve dashboard to create, schedule and report on video and social content, and to organise video playlists. It also features optional kid-safe monetisation options.

Our CTO Joshua Wohle, said “There are over 170,000 children going online for the first time every day and the kidtech ecosystem is growing equally quickly to make the broader internet compatible with this new audience. Publishers have been starved for kid-safe social and video options that are designed for the under-13 audience.”

To find out more about how we can deliver kid-safe video content on your platform, please contact us.

How much do kids (and teachers) really know about social media and advertising?

Kids and teens today have been familiar with digital media and advertising from a very young age. With technology at their fingertips, the need for our youngest generation to understand what exactly is being suggested, promised and sold is greater than ever. Media Smart, a media literacy programme for 7 to 16 year-olds, backed by a panel of industry experts and a range of supporters (including us), aims to fulfil this need by providing free resources to help young people think critically about the advertising they come across in their day-to-day lives. They called on us to help them in their mission.

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Zoella and friends: the digital stars taking the book world by storm

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It may have caught your attention a few weeks ago that the kids on your nearby school run were sporting rather more fairy wings, hook hands and witch hats than usual.

The reason? World Book Day: that time when schools across the country are flooded with little Heidis and Grinches, Gruffalos and Wimpy Kids. This year there was even a rogue Christian Grey.

In the midst of this, one mummy blogger noticed what she felt was a worrying costume trend: her daughter’s friends were planning to mark the festival of literature by dressing up as YouTube megastar Zoella.

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‘Live TV’ or ‘On Demand’ ?

on-demandAs Internet speed has improved over the past couple of years so too has the number of those watching television on ‘On Demand’.

On Demand has allowed viewers to catch up and watch their favourite programmes when it suits them and 58% of 8-16 year olds now watch TV on a laptop or computer. Not only that but TV viewing on tablets and mobiles continues to grow too, with 20% of 8-16 year olds watching TV on a tablet and 16% on a mobile. On Demand appeals to younger viewers who like the flexibility it offers, rather than having to watch programmes at their scheduled times only, giving them the freedom to engage with different media when it suits them.

That is not to say that all watch On Demand as most still prefer ‘Live’ TV with 35% of 8-16 year olds preferring it compared to 15% ‘On Demand’. BBC iPlayer is the most commonly watched On Demand service followed by ITV player, 4OD and Demand 5, while many are also streaming shows off services like Lovefilm and Netflix to avoid sitting through adverts.

To find out more about this and get the full report on the subject get in touch here