The #kidtech movement: a zero-data architecture for children’s apps and sites

At SuperAwesome, we spend a lot of time thinking about the requirements for an internet that is now used by vast numbers of children (versus it’s original design, which was solely for adults).

GDPR-K is rapidly being followed by new children’s laws in many countries that are based on the same principles — data minimisation and privacy by design.

The #kidtech movement is about eliminating (not just reducing) the risk of kids personal data collection as much as possible. Here’s why we believe that a zero-data internet is the only solution to the growing problem of kids digital privacy online.

Continue reading

How to implement COPPA-compliant push notifications in your kids app

Push notifications are a useful tool for re-engaging users and getting kids back into your app. Under both COPPA and GDPR-K, sending push notifications to kids is deemed collecting personal information, similar to an email address, and therefore requires an appropriate level of parental consent to enable.

Continue reading

What every game developer needs to know about getting parental permissions right

If you’re building a game or app for kids (under-13 in the US or under-16 in Europe), you need to consider how you’re going to manage age gates and parental permissions. Both are essential to ensure compliance with data privacy laws (COPPA and GDPR-K), but both are complex user flows and mismanaging them can create barriers to engagement for your easily-distracted young audiences.

Here’s what you need to remember:

Continue reading

5 things game developers need to know about COPPA and GDPR-K

With 170,000 kids going online for the first time every day, developers have to consider them a likely audience for their games, even if they are not deliberately child-directed. Data privacy laws for children such as COPPA (US) and GDPR-K (EU) are now well known, but the lack of clear guidance on how to apply them can make publishing such games difficult and scary for developers.

Here are five things to keep in mind if you’re developing apps or sites for a children’s audience OR which might be accessed by children:

Continue reading

Web Summit 2018: Dylan Collins, Darren Shou and Chris Williams discuss the influence of kids online

At Web Summit 2018 in Lisbon, pocket.watch’s Chris Williams, SuperAwesome‘s Dylan Collins, Symantec’s Darren Shou, and Contently’s Joe Lazauskas met to discuss the influence of kids online, and the task of marketing safely to this audience.

Continue reading

How SuperAwesome uses Hack Days to build new kidtech products

At SuperAwesome, we’re focused on building solutions for a new set of problems that haven’t really existed before (the internet has never had this many under-13 users).  Some of our most successful kidtech products have sprung from Hack Days, a quarterly event where we take new ideas from across the company, and see whether they are technically viable.

In June, we had our ninth Hack Day – check it out to find out what we built, and why we think Hack Days are so important:

Keen to join us in our mission to make the internet safer for kids? Check out our most recent job openings.

Mattel and SuperAwesome in conversation: Digital privacy and the challenges of technology for kids

With so much of our education and entertainment tied to technology and the internet in 2018, how can we ensure that children and their privacy are protected?

At Collision Conference in New Orleans, SuperAwesome CEO Dylan Collins sat down with Mattel CTO Sven Gerjets to tackle the difficult questions, including how the toy industry can protect kids privacy in the age of connected toys, and how technology is affecting the way that children play.

Continue reading

The future of tech and toys: SuperAwesome CEO Dylan Collins and Mattel CTO Sven Gerjets at Collision Conference

Mattel’s CTO Sven Gerjets joined our CEO Dylan Collins onstage at Collision Conference in New Orleans for a comprehensive discussion on the future of tech and toys in the kids market.

Speaking with Leah Hunter of Fast Company, they cover the necessity for creating responsible digital experiences for kids, what a zero-data internet looks like in practice, and how ensuring that products are private by design can ensure that kids grow up in a safe environment.

Continue reading

10 things developers should know about building digital services for kids

Two years ago we launched Kids Web Services (KWS), a platform to help developers build COPPA-compliant apps and sites for the under-13 audience. As similar data privacy laws have expanded into Europe, building engagement for the kids audience has become a challenge which many brands, content owners and game developers hadn’t planned for. Continue reading