Announcing our kid-safe alternative to YouTube’s video player for kids and family publishers

Social plugins are one of the biggest unintentional harvesters of children’s personal data. Every time a child loads a web page or app which has a social widget, it’s gathering vast amounts of personal information about their activity. YouTube’s video player is one of the biggest examples of this.

Lacking any real kidtech alternative, YouTube is the default embedded video player used by family and kids publishers and brands – but the data it collects on its under-13 users is now being viewed as a violation of COPPA. A coalition of over 20 child advocacy, consumer and privacy groups recently filed a complaint with the FTC accusing YouTube of enabling the collection of personal data on millions of children across the US.

Today we’ve announced a solution to this problem: a fully kid-safe (COPPA and GDPR-K compliant) embeddable social video player.

Already delivering millions of video views, our embeddable video player is part of the PopJam Connect platform, which also provides tools for kid-safe social engagement for content owners and brands.

The player integrates PopJam’s award-winning kid-safe social features, enabling children to safely engage with content. It can be customised by the publisher, with a self-serve dashboard to create, schedule and report on video and social content, and to organise video playlists. It also features optional kid-safe monetisation options.

Our CTO Joshua Wohle, said “There are over 170,000 children going online for the first time every day and the kidtech ecosystem is growing equally quickly to make the broader internet compatible with this new audience. Publishers have been starved for kid-safe social and video options that are designed for the under-13 audience.”

To find out more about how we can deliver kid-safe video content on your platform, please contact us.

Five lessons from the report showing thousands of Google Play kids’ apps are in breach of COPPA

An academic study published this week reveals that thousands of kids’ apps are collecting and transmitting personal information to third parties, in possible breach of COPPA (and soon, GDPR-K).

 The research from academics at the University of California at Berkeley is the most comprehensive ever done to assess the data collection and sharing practices of the most popular kids’ games and apps, and the results were covered in The Guardian and elsewhere.

It demonstrates how hard it is to comply with COPPA using existing ad technology built for the adult market, vs kidtech that is based on zero-data collection.  And it usefully highlights the lack of common frameworks and standards between the regulators, the app stores and developers.

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The GDPR-K Toolkit for Kids Publishers Part Six: Obtaining verifiable parental consent

Europe’s new data privacy law, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), will be enforced from May 2018.  This law obliges all companies with consumers based in the EU to enable new data privacy protection. For websites and apps whose audience is primarily kids, additional requirements apply, commonly known as GDPR-Kids (GDPR-K).

Part Six of our comprehensive GDPR-K Toolkit covers collecting data and obtaining verifiable parental consent.

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The GDPR-K Toolkit for Kids Publishers Part Five: Kid-safe user acquisition

Europe’s new data privacy law, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), will be enforced from May 2018.  This law obliges all companies with consumers based in the EU to enable new data privacy protection. For websites and apps whose audience is primarily kids, additional requirements apply, commonly known as GDPR-Kids (GDPR-K).

Part Five of our comprehensive GDPR-K Toolkit covers acquiring new users and leveraging cross-promotion.

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The GDPR-K Toolkit for Kids Publishers Part Four: Safely monetise your site or app

Europe’s new data privacy law, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), will be enforced from May 2018.  This law obliges all companies with consumers based in the EU to enable new data privacy protection. For websites and apps whose audience is primarily kids, additional requirements apply, commonly known as GDPR-Kids (GDPR-K).

So far, we have covered auditing your technology partners, defining your audience and revising your policy notices. Now that you’ve covered the basics of compliance, we can look at how to maximise advertising revenue from your kids audience.

If you had previously written off your under-13 audience as ‘zero revenue’, think again.

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The GDPR-K Toolkit for Kids Publishers Part Three: Revise your privacy notices

Europe’s new data privacy law, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), will be enforced from May 2018.  This law obliges all companies with consumers based in the EU to enable new data privacy protection. For websites and apps whose audience is primarily kids, additional requirements apply, commonly known as GDPR-Kids (GDPR-K).

In this series we outline the steps you ought to take immediately to prepare for GDPR-K. Part One dealt with auditing your technology partners. Part Two dealt with defining and articulating your compliance strategy. Part Three covers how best to revise your privacy notices.

Once you have regained control over the data collection that happens on your site or app (Part One), and have determined ‘who you are’ under GDPR-K (Part Two), it’s time to rewrite your terms of service and privacy policies.

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The GDPR-K Toolkit for Kids Publishers Part Two: Defining your audience

Europe’s new data privacy law, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), will be enforced from May 2018.  This law obliges all companies with consumers based in the EU to enable new data privacy protection. For websites and apps whose audience is primarily kids, additional requirements apply, commonly known as GDPR-Kids (GDPR-K).

In this series we outline the steps you ought to take immediately to prepare for GDPR-K. Part One dealt with auditing your technology partners. Part Two deals with defining and articulating your compliance strategy.

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The GDPR-K Toolkit for Kids Publishers Part One: Audit your technology partners

Europe’s new data privacy law, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), will be enforced from May 2018.  This law obliges all companies with consumers based in the EU to enable new data privacy protection. For websites and apps whose audience is primarily kids, additional requirements apply, commonly known as GDPR-Kids (GDPR-K).

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