How to implement COPPA-compliant push notifications in your kids app

Push notifications are a useful tool for re-engaging users and getting kids back into your app. Under both COPPA and GDPR-K, sending push notifications to kids is deemed collecting personal information, similar to an email address, and therefore requires an appropriate level of parental consent to enable.

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What every game developer needs to know about getting parental permissions right

If you’re building a game or app for kids (under-13 in the US or under-16 in Europe), you need to consider how you’re going to manage age gates and parental permissions. Both are essential to ensure compliance with data privacy laws (COPPA and GDPR-K), but both are complex user flows and mismanaging them can create barriers to engagement for your easily-distracted young audiences.

Here’s what you need to remember:

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5 things game developers need to know about COPPA and GDPR-K

With 170,000 kids going online for the first time every day, developers have to consider them a likely audience for their games, even if they are not deliberately child-directed. Data privacy laws for children such as COPPA (US) and GDPR-K (EU) are now well known, but the lack of clear guidance on how to apply them can make publishing such games difficult and scary for developers.

Here are five things to keep in mind if you’re developing apps or sites for a children’s audience OR which might be accessed by children:

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The biggest kids trends for 2019

At SuperAwesome, when it comes to kids trends, we like to go straight to the experts for their opinions (and drawings). Last year, we asked PopJam’s community to predict 2018’s biggest kids trends, and they accurately called out that slime, unicorns, fidget toys, squishies and iPhones would be the biggest hits of 2018.

When we checked in with the community for 2019’s kids trends, many kids predicted similar strands filtering through into next year. However, increasingly, kids are moving away from obsession with tangible objects like squishies, and directing their attention to the digital.

Here’s what the community called out for 2019:

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Web Summit 2018: Dylan Collins, Darren Shou and Chris Williams discuss the influence of kids online

At Web Summit 2018 in Lisbon, pocket.watch’s Chris Williams, SuperAwesome‘s Dylan Collins, Symantec’s Darren Shou, and Contently’s Joe Lazauskas met to discuss the influence of kids online, and the task of marketing safely to this audience.

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The biggest kids trends of 2018, as chosen by kids

Want to know which trends will be driving kids crazy in 2018? Then you need to ask the experts – the kids themselves!

PopJam – our kid-safe, content-sharing platform for under-13s  – isn’t just a moderated and creative walled garden, it’s also a window into the minds of kids. As a COPPA and GDPR compliant product we don’t collect any data on our users, but we never stop learning from them or asking for their thoughts.

At the end of December we asked kids what they thought the biggest trends of 2017 were – and here’s what they came up with.

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COPPA turns 20: How it has impacted data privacy law for children

The pioneering law protecting children’s activity online, COPPA, is 20 years old this week.

 The occasion is being marked by events taking place on Capitol Hill this week and at Georgetown University next week, where the original author of the landmark legislation, Sen. Ed Markey (District of Massachusetts), and industry participants are discussing the law’s impact and where to take it next.

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Kids’ Trends of Q3 2018: Baby Shark, Gacha, Fortnite and memes…

At the start of this year we asked PopJammers about their trend predictions for 2018 and have followed each quarter to see how accurate they were.

Slime, squishies, unicorns and iPhones have been huge this year. Fidget spinners didn’t last the year and no one saw Fortnite coming, but as usual the experts on kids (the kids themselves) were pretty spot on. Continue reading